In the News: “Being the bigger man” Led to Grisly Murder

If you somehow missed reading the highly disturbing details of the murder of Seath Tyler Jackson, I consider you a lucky person. I’m not going to recap it for you, because I also found it highly disturbing. On another level, though, I found the article’s conclusion quote just as disturbing, and it’s from a friend of the victim who attempted to stop him from going to the house where he was murdered.

Jones, the friend who tried to stop Jackson from going to the house, said the killing should never have happened.

“It’s just boys and their stupid fights,” Jones said. “It’s just who wants to be the bigger man.”

If wanting to be the “bigger man” leads to heinous crime like this, perhaps being the bigger man shouldn’t be such an aspirational thing.


Quick Hits: Men and Masculinity in the News

Mychal Denzel Smith at the Root addresses the use of a homophobic slur by Kobe Bryant, and how homophobia needs to be addressed through re-examination of what it means to be a man.

On TomDispatch.com, Rebecca Solnit discusses the notion of male arrogance in her essay Men Explain Things To Me.

A look into the Conference on Male Studies comes across the Daily Transom at the NY Observer.

Newsweek asks whether or not manhood can survive the lost decade of the “Great Humbling” for “Beached White Males.” Somehow I think they’ll find a way.


In the News: NYTimes Coverage of Sexual Assault

While a lot of the news makes my blood boil, certain stories make my head explode. Today’s NYTimes coverage of a sexual assault case regarding an 11 year old girl in Cleveland, Texas would fall into the latter category.

Eighteen men and boys ranging in age from middle-schoolers to 27 year old adult men have been arrested in connection with this case, where the girl was repeatedly assaulted in an abandoned trailer. Videos were recorded on cellphones. Mob mentality must have reigned. What the article fails to do, however, is ask anything of the men who are accused of committing these acts. Instead, the Times runs quotes about how these men will “have to live with this for the rest of their lives” and others that ask questions such as “Where was her mother?”

Where was her mother? Where were the parents of these boys and men? While victim-blaming is unfortunately common, it’s grating to see it perpetuated by an institution like the Times. I hate to say I expect better, because it never happens, but I do. These men are not “victims” in the way the anonymous girl is and they shouldn’t be pitied as such. Jamelle Bouie at the American Prospect elaborates on this kind of treatment of sexual assault.